National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior

National Register of Historic Places Program:
Lists of Weekly Actions 2012

The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the Nation's historic places worthy of preservation. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service's National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America's historic and archeological resources.

 

 

 

Weekly List Main page (with links to all years)

Click on week for all actions

                                   Highlighted Property of the week

Weekly List for December 28, 2012

American Woolen Company Foxcroft Mill,
Piscataquis County, Maine
The American Woolen Company Foxcroft Mill, located on the west side of the Piscataquis River in downtown Dover-Foxcroft, Maine, is comprised of seven buildings and three structures that represent several types, styles, and methods of construction. Read more . . .

Weekly List for December 21, 2012

Edgefield, Greenbrier County, West Virginia
Edgefield’s historic significance spans the years 1935-1960, when Floy Whiting Whorrell (a widow and daughter of George W. Whiting) actively managed the farm. Read more . . .

Weekly List for December 14, 2012

Poloa Defensive Fortifications,  Poloa, American Samoa
During World War II three defensive fortifications were built along the coast at the village of Poloa in western Tutuila, to defend the island from possible Japanese attack. The 2nd Marine Brigade landed at Pago Pago, American Samoa, on January 23, 1942, to defend the vital island and keep open the supply link with Australia,.  Read more . . .

Weekly List for December 7, 2012

Malesso Japanese Rice Mill, Merizo, Guam
The Malesso Japanese Rice Mill was constructed on December 24, 1943 during the Japanese occupation of Guam in World War II, and was used to store rice and house Chamorro villagers forced into labor in the race paddies. The Malesso Japanese Rice Mill is the only extant non-military building constructed during the Japanese occupation of Guam. Read more . . .

Weekly List for November 30, 2012

Norfolk & Western Railway Freight Station, Roanoke, Virginia
Freight rail service to Roanoke (then known as Big Lick) commenced in 1852. In 1882, Roanoke became the most important junction point as well as corporate headquarters for the newly formed Norfolk & Western Railway, which became a major carrier of coal from mines in West Virginia and Virginia. Read more . . .

Weekly List for November 23, 2012

Washington Miller House, Columbia, Tennessee
Washington Miller inherited over 200 acres of land and a cotton gin. In 1851 he constructed his new home on this land where he and his wife, Susan, lived. During the Civil War, armies from both sides crossed the farming land, and Union troops ransacked cotton bales from Washington Miller’s gin, following the retreat of John Bell Hood’s Confederate Army.  Read more . . .

Weekly List for November 16, 2012

Williams--Gierth House, Poplar Bluff, Missouri
Constructed in 1892 as a residence for Horace Dickinson Williams, President of the H.D. Williams Cooperage factory, it was later the residence of entrepreneur Charles Gierth. The house’s whimsical conical turrets and dormers, large massing and shingled second story mark the house as one built in the Shingle Style, and was the town’s most eclectic in form.  Read more . . .

Weekly List for November 9, 2012

Rose City Golf Clubhouse, Portland, Oregon
The Rose City Golf Clubhouse was the second municipal golf course established in Oregon and the oldest surviving example of a municipal golf clubhouse in Portland. Constructed in 1931 and 1932, the clubhouse was designed by Portland architect Herbert A. Angell and constructed by general contractor B. T. Allyn. Read more . . .

Weekly List for November 2, 2012

San Jose de los Jemez Mission and Giusewa Pueblo Site, Sandoval County, New Mexico
The San José de los Jémez Mission and Gíusewa Pueblo Site in Sandoval County, New Mexico, includes the remains of an early 17th-century mission complex and a Jémez Indian pueblo importantly associated with the Spanish colonial and Native American history of the nation.  Read more . . .

Weekly List for October 26, 2012

University Indian Ruin Archeological Research District,
Tucson, Arizona
This district includes University Indian Ruin, a prehistoric archeological village, as well as a historic complex of archeological research facilities that was constructed in the 1930s.  Read More . . .

Weekly List for October 19, 2012

Howard Lodge, Howard County, Maryland
Howard Lodge, constructed ca. 1750, is one of the earliest surviving buildings in Howard County, Maryland. The land upon which Howard Lodge sits was granted by patent from Lord Baltimore to John Taillor [Taylor] in 1727. Read More . . .

Weekly List for October 12, 2012

Togus VA Medical Center and National Cemetery, Kennebec County, Maine
Founded in 1866, the Togus VA Medical Center and National Cemetery is the oldest veteran's facility in the country. It is presently home to the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical and Regional Office Center. The center consists of a medical complex with historic and modern residential, hospital, and support buildings, along with two historic national cemeteries, in a landscaped setting.  Read more . . .

Weekly List for October 5, 2012

Yamashiro Historic District, Los Angeles, California
Yamashiro (Japanese for “Castle on the Hill”), also known as the Bernheimer Villa and Oriental Gardens, was the vision of brothers Adolph and Eugene Bernheimer, German-born cotton barons and avid Asian Art collectors. The Bernheimers purchased several acres of hillside property in the heart of Hollywood for the construction of an expansive estate and gardens.  Read more . . .

Weekly List for September 28, 2012

W. Henry Lewis House, Polk County, Florida
The W. Henry Lewis House, built in 1901, is a two-story wooden Queen Anne style home, and retains a very high level of historic physical integrity. The house is a distinctive variation of the Queen Anne Style of architecture, developed by English architect Richard Norman Shaw for grand manor houses in the 1860s.  Read more . . .

Weekly List for September 21, 2012

School Street Barn, Hampden County, Massachusetts
The School Street Barn in Hampden County, Massachusetts, stands as the last remaining 19th-century barn in Agawam Center. In use as a working barn for approximately 100 years, the School Street Barn is significant for its uncommon use as a major component of a city jail farm, as distinct from a prison farm.  Read more . .

Weekly List for September 14, 2012

PT-658 (motor torpedo boat), Multnomah County, Oregon
Built during World War II in 1945 at Higgins Industries Boatworks in New Orleans, PT-658 is a fully-restored and operational example of a rare 625 Class Higgins Patrol Torpedo Boat (PT Boat). Although they were small and crewed by only 16 sailors, the PT boat was an indispensible part of combat actions used against the Axis powers throughout the Pacific and European theaters of war. Read more . . .

Weekly List for September 7, 2012

Robert M. Hanes House, Forsyth County, Winston-Salem, North Carolina
Robert M. Hanes (1890-1959), was a banker, an economic advisor to post-World War II Europe, and a founder of Research Triangle Park. In 1937, Hanes commissioned New York landscape architect Ellen Shipman, the “dean of American women architects” to design the rear garden for the  residence. Read more . . .

Weekly List for August 31, 2012

Mt. Airy (Grandma Moses House), Augusta County, Virginia
Grandma Moses was a prominent painter who started creating pictures in the 1930s from her memories as a farm wife both in the Virginia Shenandoah Valley and the New York Hoosick Valley. Moses moved to the Shenandoah Valley in November of 1887, with her husband Thomas Solomon Moses. Mt. Airy was the first house she and her husband owned in their married lives---they bought it for $6,000 and lived there from January 1901 to September 1902. Read more . . .

Weekly List for August 24, 2012

Stone Arch Bridge, Cheshire County, New Hampshire
Completed in 1847, the great Stone Arch Bridge that spans the Branch River in South Keene, New Hampshire, was one of the most impressive masonry arches to be constructed in the United States before 1850. The arch over Branch River surmounted the final major obstacle preventing a railroad connection to Keene from the south. Read more . . .

Weekly List for August 17, 2012

Elkhorn Band Shell, Sunset Park, Wisconsin
At the local concert held in Mid-August of 1926, the local paper reported that an estimated 4,000 people came to hear the Holton-Elkhorn Band in their new band shell. When the County Courthouse expanded and threatened the Elkhorn Band Shell in 1963, concerned citizens acted to preserve it, and the Elkhorn Band Shell was moved to Sunset Park.  Read more . . .

Weekly List for August 10, 2012

Distrito Histórico del Viejo San Juan--Old San Juan Historic District (Boundary Increase),  San Juan, Puerto Rico
The Distrito Histórico del Viejo/Old San Juan Historic District is the second oldest continuously inhabited European settlement in the Western Hemisphere. Conceived as the capital of the island of Puerto Rico and known for centuries as the ciudad del puerto Rico (the city of the rich port), it is the oldest urban core in the island and the United States of America.  Read more . . .

Weekly List for August 3, 2012

Elizabeth C. Quinlan House, Hennepin County, Minnesota
The house was created for Elizabeth C. Quinlan, who was the co-founder of the Young-Quinlan Company, which, in 1894, was the first woman’s ready-to-wear shop west of the Mississippi River. Her highly successful department store, innovative practices and entrepreneurial work led her to become a leader of national recognition in the apparel industry and a pioneering business woman. Read more . . .

Weekly List for July 27, 2012

Northwestern National Life Insurance Company Home Office, Hennepin County, Minnesota
Within ten years of being established in 1885 a corporate shakedown that rivaled New York’s Equitable scandal of 1905 nearly toppled Northwestern National, but intervention by the state government under the direction of Governor John Johnson put the company on the road to recovery. Read more . . .

Weekly List for July 20, 2012

RCA Studio B, Davidson County, Tennessee
Elvis Presley recorded his music here. Waylon Jennings, Dolly Parton and Willie Nelson did likewise. Even non-RCA artists who worked for other labels, such as Roy Orbison and the Everly Brothers, also recorded here. Read more . . .

Weekly List for July 13, 2012

NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Historic District, Hampton (Independent City), Virginia
From its beginnings in 1917, the NASA Langley Research Center has examined complex and groundbreaking issues associated with flight and space travel. Read more . . .

Weekly List for July 6, 2012

Enos Kellogg House, Fairfield County, Connecticut
The Enos Kellogg House is an outstanding example of a New England farmhouse that was designed and constructed in the saltbox form, and contains many of the original architectural details. Read more . . .

Weekly List for June 29, 2012

Ellenville Downtown Historic District, Ulster County,
New York
The Ellenville Downtown Historic District contains visible geographical and architectural elements that represent its origins as a commercial and industrial crossroads. Read more . . .

Weekly List for June 22, 2012

Hotel Albert, New York County, New York
Writers who have stayed at the Albert over the years include Robert Louis Stevenson, Hart Crane, Thomas Wolfe, Richard Wright, Samuel R. Delany, Anaïs Nin, Robert Lowell and Leroi Jones/ Amiri Baraka, among others. Read more . . .

Weekly List for June 15, 2012

Siebels' Department Store--Boyer Valley Bank, Harrison County, Iowa
The Siebels' Department Store--Boyer Valley Bank is important in local history for being one of the largest, longest-lasting and well-known stores in Woodbine, Iowa.  Read more . . .

Weekly List for June 8, 2012

Ghost Ranch Lodge, Pima County, Arizona
Since 1941, Ghost Ranch Lodge in Tucson, Arizona, has played an important role in the tourist commerce, specifically for its influence on the planning, design and development of subsequent motor hotels as seen along Miracle Mile Road at the city’s northern gateway. Read more . . .

Weekly List for June 1, 2012

Saratoga National Historical Park, Saratoga County, New York
The Battles of Saratoga were pivotal turning points in the American struggle to gain independence from Great Britain during the Revolutionary War. The American victory at Saratoga proved that the Continental Army had developed into a formidable fighting force capable of defeating a British Army in general battle. Read more . . .

Weekly List for May 25, 2012

Tamassee DAR School, Oconee County, South Carolina
Founded with the purpose of helping poor, rural children gain access to formal education, most students who enrolled at the Tamassee DAR School also worked on small farms or in the area’s textile mills to support their families. Read more . . .

Weekly List for May 18, 2012

United States Post Office and Court House, Wausau, Wisconsin
From its opening in 1938, until its postal operations ceased in 1969, the building served as the center for the city’s postal operation, as one of a handful of federal circuit courts in northern Wisconsin, and as the nexus for federal agencies such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Labor Department, and the Internal Revenue Service. Read more . . .

Weekly List for May 11, 2012

Dr. Lucius Charles Alston House, Maricopa County, Arizona
The Dr. Lucius Charles Alston House is associated with the history of the development of the African American community in Mesa, Arizona and the community’s future after World War I. Read more . . .

Weekly List for May 4, 2012

Peirce Mill (amended nomination), Washington, D.C.
Peirce Mill, located within Washington D.C.’s scenic Rock Creek Park, was constructed in 1829 and stands as the only extant water-driven grist mill in the District of Columbia.
Read more . . .

Weekly List for April 27, 2012

ATSF Locomotive No. 3415, Dickinson County, Kansas
Locomotive No. 3415 is the only 3400 Pacific class that remains operational in Kansas. Today, it carries tourists and museum visitors. It was once part of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe (ATSF) Railroad. Read more…

Weekly List for April 20, 2012

Delta Kappa Gamma Society International Headquarters Building, Austin, Travis County, Texas
The Delta Kappa Gamma Society International Headquarters Building was built in 1956 as the international office of the Delta Kappa Gamma Society, an organization founded in 1929 to improve women’s opportunities in the field of education.  Read more . . .

Weekly List for April 13, 2012

Prince William Forest Park Historic District, Prince William County, Virginia
From Native Americans to the New Deal, from spy recruits to urban campers, discover the rich and diverse history of Prince William Forest Park in Virginia. 
Read more . . .

Weekly List for April 6, 2012

Paradise Gardens, Chattooga County, Georgia
Find out what R.E.M., a sacred vision, a really big bottle of Coke, and Paradise have in common.
Read more . . .

Weekly List for March 30, 2012

Steel Development House No. 2, Riverside County, California
This midcentury modern designed home is made of glass and steel.  It was specifically designed for affordability, and durability in the desert.  Read more…

Weekly List for March 23, 2012

Women's Rights National Historic Park (Boundary Increase), Seneca County, New York
The Women’s Rights National Historic Park District is composed of four discontinuous units that are thematically linked to the early 19th century Women’s Rights Movement in the United States and to the First Women’s Rights Convention, held in Seneca Falls, New York, in 1848.  Read more . . .

Weekly List for March 16, 2012

Fenway Park, Suffolk County, Massachusetts
The nature of the experience of Fenway Park derives from the intimacy of the space and the proximity of the fans to the team (as well as to each other,) and from the pleasure of being a part of the continuum in the team's history as well as the past longstanding agony of enduring the team's failures. Read  more . . .

Weekly List for March 9, 2012

Cabot's Old Indian Pueblo Museum, Riverside County, California
Cabot Abram Yerxa, an artist and Native American advocate, built this rambling four-story structure, patterned after Pueblos built by the Hopi Indians of the Southwest. Completed and opened to the public as a Trading Post, Museum/Art gallery and personal residence in 1944, it was a noted feature of the town of Desert Hot Springs, California.  Read more . . .

Weekly List for March 2, 2012

Odd Fellows Home of Dell Rapids, Minnehaha County, South Dakota
This 1910 Sioux quartzite building, along with grounds and structures, was built by the International Order of of the Odd Fellows to serve as a home for orphans and the eldery. From 1910 until 1947, members of the community were cared for in this facility. Read more . . .

Weekly List for February 24, 2012

Oakwood Cemetery, Goodhue County, Minnesota
One of Oakwood’s  unique resources is the cemetery’s own landscape, a combination of topography, roads, paths, plants, historic monuments, buildings and other structures. Read more . . .

Weekly List for February 17, 2012

Kirby Jail and Town Hall, Hot Springs County, Wyoming
This jail and town hall building in the town of Kirby has been well-preserved and represents this small Wyoming community. Built in 1915, it was the first and only building erected by the local government. Read More . . .

Weekly List for February 10, 2012

Borden Homes Historic District, Maricopa County, Arizona
Building the American Dream!  Ranch Style architecture developed in response to the need to build many houses as quickly and inexpensively as possible while still providing the "American Dream" home in a pleasant and familiar form.  Read more . . .

Weekly List for February 3, 2012

Buchanan Cellers Mill, Yamhill County, Oregon
Constructed in 1888, this flour mill is one of McMinnville's oldest industrial/commercial buildings and one of only a handful of tangible reminders of the City's agricultural beginnings. Read more…

Weekly List for January 27, 2012

William Jennings Bryan House, Miami-Dade County, Florida
This Mediterranean Revival style mansion was home of William Jennings Bryan, statesman and great orator, during his later years. The home is part of Miami's old historic "Millionaires Row." Read more . . .

Weekly List for January 20, 2012

Denver and Intermountain Railroad Interurban No. 25 This railway car operated between Golden and Denver, Colorado. It was designed and built by the Woeber company of Denver and is one of the only remaining cars of its type in the country.  Read more . . .

Weekly List for January 13, 2012

Temple B’Nai Israel in Olean, NY, stands as a highly intact example of an early 20th century synagogue in a small city in Western New York. Demonstrating its architect’s knowledge of national trends in synagogue architecture, its design combines a variety of motifs derived from historic southern and eastern European styles, as well as Middle Eastern architecture.  Read more . . .

Weekly List for January 6, 2012

Georgia Welcome Center, Screven County, Georgia. The art moderne Georgia Welcome Center is a prototype of many tourist information centers in Georgia.  It played a central in Governor Vandiver’s successful 1960s endeavor to increase tourism throughout the state.  Read More…