Maltese Cross Cabin, Medora, ND

What
The restoration of Theodore Roosevelt's Maltese Cross Cabin in Medora, ND. This two-story, three-room cabin was one of Roosevelt's homes when he lived in the Dakota Territory prior to becoming the 26th President of the United States.

Where
Theodore Roosevelt National Park, Medora, ND

Reconstruction Timetable
April - July 2000

Why
Roosevelt's time in the Dakota "Badlands" is credited with helping to shape his strong belief in natural resource conservation and earned him the name, "Father of Conservation." Roosevelt witnessed the destruction of valuable natural resources during his time as a cowboy and rancher in the badlands. During his time as president, he founded the U.S. Forest Service, five national parks, 51 wildlife refuges and reserved 150 million acres of land as national forest. Roosevelt's experience in the Dakota Territory was also significant for other reasons. While there, he came to terms with personal tragedy, including the deaths of his mother and first wife who died on the same day in 1884. He built a strong body and learned to work and live with men who were poorer and rougher than he - a sharp distinction from his wealthy, East Coast upbringing. Roosevelt himself was quoted as saying his life as a cowboy and rancher is what allowed him to become president. "If it had not been for my years in North Dakota," he said, "I never would have become President of the United States."

Partnership
The restoration of Roosevelt's cabin is being funded by Aurora Foods Inc., makers of Log Cabin syrup, as part of its four-year, $1 million commitment to restoring log cabins in National Parks across the country. The "Discover Presidential Log Cabins" program marks the third year of the public/private partnership between Aurora Foods and the National Park Foundation (NPF), in cooperation with the National Park Service (NPS).

Contacts
Bruce Kaye, Theodore Roosevelt National Park, 701-623-4466 (bruce_kaye@nps.gov)
Jen Larson, National Park Foundation, 202-530-1487 (jlarson@goparks.org)
Sue Waldron, National Park Service, 202-208-5477 (sue_waldron@nps.gov)

Jill Sharp or Kim Scher, Lord, Sullivan & Yoder, 614-846-7777 (jsharp@lsy.com; kscher@lsy.com)