Detail of restored roof; Link to Parknet
STANDARDS FOR RESTORATION AND GUIDELINES FOR RESTORING HISTORIC BUILDINGS
<Photo>Person using accessible ramp

Although the work in the following sections is quite often an important aspect of restoration projects, it is usually not part of the overall process of preserving features from the restoration period (protection, stabilization, conservation, repair, and replacement); rather, such work is assessed for its potential negative impact on the building's historic appearance. For this reason, particular care must be taken not to obscure, alter, or damage features from the restoration period in the process of undertaking work to meet code and energy requirements.


Recommend
Identifying spaces, features, and finishes from the restoration period so that accessibility code-required work will not result in their damage or loss.

Complying with barrier-free access requirements, in such a manner that spaces, features, and finishes from the restoration period are preserved.

Working with local disability groups, access specialists, and historic preservation specialists to determine the most appropriate solution to access problems.

photo showing how a door handle was successfully retrofitted to meet ADA requirements




Historic hardware can be retained in place, or adapted with the addition of an automatic opener, of which there are several types. This door handle has been retrofitted to meet ADA requirements. Photo: NPS files.

Providing barrier-free access that promotes independence for the disabled person to the highest degree practicable, while preserving significant historic features.

Finding solutions to meet accessibility requirements that minimize the impact on the historic building and its site, such as compatible ramps, paths, and lifts.

Not Recommended
Undertaking code-required alterations before identifying those spaces, features, or finishes from the restoration period which must be preserved.

Altering, damaging, or destroying features from the restoration period in attempting to comply with accessibility requirements.

Making changes to buildings without first seeking expert advice from access specialists and historic preservationists to determine solutions.

Making access modifications that do not provide a reasonable balance between independent, safe access and preservation of historic features.

Making modifications for accessibility without considering the impact on the historic building and its site.

 

-GUIDELINES-

The Approach

Exterior Materials
Masonry
Wood
Architectural Metals

Exterior Features
Roofs
Windows
Entrances + Porches
Storefronts

Interior Features
Structural System Spaces/Features/Finishes
Mechanical Systems

Site

Setting

Special Requirements
Energy Efficiency
Accessibility
Health + Safety

The Standards

 

  HISTORICAL OVERVIEW - PRESERVING - REHABILITATING - restoring- RECONSTRUCTING

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Historical Overview