<photo> Detail of interior wood feature; Link to National Park Service
Introduction to Standards and Guidelines: Historical Overview
<photo>detail of a row of porch steps

Entrances and porches are quite often the focus of historic buildings, particularly on primary elevations. Together with their functional and decorative features such as doors, steps, balustrades, pilasters, and entablatures, they can be extremely important in defining the overall character of a building. In many cases, porches were energy-saving devices, shading southern and western elevations. Usually entrances and porches were integral components of a historic building's design; for example, porches on Greek Revival houses, with Doric or Ionic columns and pediments, echoed the architectural elements and features of the larger building. Central one-bay porches or arcaded porches are evident in Italianate style buildings of the 1860s. Doors of Renaissance Revival style buildings frequently supported entablatures or pediments. Porches were particularly prominent features of Eastlake and Stick Style houses in which porch posts, railings, and balusters were characterized by a massive and robust quality, with members turned on a lathe. Porches of bungalows of the early 20th century were characterized by tapered porch posts, exposed post and beams, and low pitched roofs with wide overhangs. Art Deco commercial buildings were entered through stylized glass and stainless steel doors.

 

-INTRODUCTION-

Choosing Treatment

Using the Standards + Guidelines

-Historical Overview-

Exterior Materials
Masonry
Wood
Architectural Metals

Exterior Features
Roofs
Windows
Entrances + Porches
Storefronts

Interior Features
Structural System Spaces/Features/Finishes
Mechanical Systems

Site

Setting

Special Requirements
Energy Efficiency
Accessibility
Health + Safety
New Additions

 

 

historical overview - PRESERVING - REHABILITATING - RESTORING - RECONSTRUCTING

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