<photo> Detail of interior wood feature; Link to National Park Service>
Introduction to Standards and Guidelines: Historical Overview
detail photo of historic building with awnings

Work that must be done to meet accessibility requirements, health and safety requirements or retrofitting to improve energy efficiency is usually not part of the overall process of protecting historic buildings; rather, this work is assessed for its potential impact on the historic building.

Some features of a historic building or site such as cupolas, shutters, transoms, skylights, sun rooms, porches, and plantings can play an energy-conserving role. Therefore, prior to retrofitting historic buildings to make them more energy efficient, the first step should always be to identify and evaluate existing historic features to assess their inherent energy-conserving potential. If it is determined that retrofitting measures are appropriate, then such work needs to be carried out with particular care to ensure that the building's historic character is retained.

 

-INTRODUCTION-

Choosing Treatment

Using the Standards + Guidelines

-Historical Overview-

Exterior Materials
Masonry
Wood
Architectural Metals

Exterior Features
Roofs
Windows
Entrances + Porches
Storefronts

Interior Features
Structural System Spaces/Features/Finishes
Mechanical Systems

Site

Setting

Special Requirements
Energy Efficiency
Accessibility
Health + Safety
New Additions

 

 

historical overview - PRESERVING - REHABILITATING - RESTORING - RECONSTRUCTING

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