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Abandoned Shipwreck Act Guidelines

PART IV. Shipwrecks in the National Register of Historic Places*

*NOTE: This web posting of "Part IV. Shipwrecks in the National Register of Historic Places" is a compilation of shipwrecks and hulks that were listed or determined eligible for the National Register as of December 4, 1990, when the "Abandoned Shipwreck Act Guidelines" were published in the Federal Register (55 FR 50116). Since that date, many other shipwrecks and hulks have been listed or determined eligible for the National Register but are not included in this web posting. For information about other shipwrecks and hulks that are on the National Register, please visit the National Register Information System (NRIS) to search the National Register database.

As of December 4, 1990, there were 142 shipwrecks (and hulks) listed in or determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Where known, the popular name; vessel name, if different from the popular name; type of vessel; date of construction; wreck date and location; owner; manager, if different from the owner; and level of historical significance of these shipwrecks are listed below. As required by section 6(b) of the Act, the public is hereby given notice that, under the Act, the U.S. Government has asserted title to the abandoned shipwrecks listed below and transferred its title to the respective States in or on whose submerged lands the shipwrecks are located, except for shipwrecks in or on public and Indian lands. The U.S. Government retains its title to shipwrecks in or on the public lands of the United States while Indian tribes hold title to those in or on Indian lands.

Alabama

U.S.S. Tecumseh. This iron hulled Union monitor, built in 1863 and sunk in 1864, is entitled to sovereign immunity. The intact wreck is buried in 29 feet of water in Mobile Bay near Mobile. Owned by the U.S. Government, General Services Administration. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Alaska

Lieut. C. V. Donaldson. The hulk of this wooden hulled steamer lies on the shoreline at Belmont Point near Nome. Built in 1907, she was laid up in 1955. Privately owned. Listed in the National Register is nationally significant.

Arizona

Charles H. Spencer. This wooden hulled stern-wheel steamer, built in 1911, lies in 20 feet of water near the shoreline of the Colorado River near Lees Ferry, within Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. Owned by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as regionally significant.

California

City of Rio de Janeiro. This iron hulled steamer, built in 1878, was wrecked in 1901 off Point Diablo near San Francisco. The intact wreck lies in 320 feet of water just off the Golden Gate. Owned by the State of California, State Lands Commission. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

King Philip. The remains of this wooden hulled clipper, built in 1856, are buried on Ocean Beach in San Francisco, within Golden Gate National Recreation Area. Owned by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

King Street Ship. This wooden hulled whaler named Lydia, built in 1840, was laid up in 1907. Remains of this shipwreck are buried at the foot of King Street in San Francisco. Owned by the city and county of San Francisco. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Reporter. The scattered remains of this wooden hulled schooner, built in 1876, are intermingled with the remains of King Philip and are buried in 5 feet of water on Ocean Beach in San Francisco, within Golden Gate National Recreation Area. Owned by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Stamboul. The remains of this wooden hulled whaler, built in 1843, are buried in 6 feet of water at the foot of 12th Street in Benicia, within Matthew Turner Shipyard Park. Owned by the city of Benicia. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Tennessee. The scattered remains of this wooden hulled side-wheel steamer, built in 1848 and wrecked in 1853, are buried in 10 feet of water in the Tennessee Cove near Marin City, within Golden Gate National Recreation Area. Owned jointly by the U.S. Government, National Park Service, and the State of California, State Lands Commission. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

William Gray. This wooden hulled packet ship, built in 1827, was sunk in 1852 for use as a wharf. The hulk is buried beneath Battery and Greenwich Streets in San Francisco. Privately owned. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Winfield Scott. The scattered remains of this wooden hulled side-wheel steamer, built in 1850 and wrecked off Anacapa Island, are buried in 25 feet of water in Channel Islands National Park and National Marine Sanctuary. Owned by the State of California, State Lands Commission. Managed jointly by the U.S. Government, National Park Service and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Connecticut

Berkshire No. 7. The intact remains of this steel and wooden canal barge, built in 1935, lie in 20 feet of water in Bridgeport Harbor. Privately owned. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Elmer S. Dailey. The intact remains of this wooden Erie Canal barge, built in 1915, lie in 20 feet of water in Bridgeport Harbor. Privately owned. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Priscilla Dailey. The intact remains of this wooden Champlain Canal barge, built in 1929, lie in 20 feet of water in Bridgeport Harbor. Privately owned. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Delaware

State of Pennsylvania. This steel hulled passenger steamship was built in 1923. Her intact hulk lies in 5 feet of water on the shore of the Christina River near Wilmington. Privately owned. Listed in the National Register as locally significant.

Florida

Barge Site. Remains of this wooden barge are buried in Biscayne National Park. Owned by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, level of historical significance of this wreck is undetermined.

Boiler Site. This wooden vessel, named St. Lucie, was built in 1888 and wrecked in 1906. Remains of this shipwreck are scattered on the bottomlands of Biscayne National Park. Owned by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, level of historical significance of this wreck is undetermined.

Hubbard. Scattered remains of this wooden Colonial merchant vessel, wrecked in 1772, lie in 20 feet of water in Elliot Key in Biscayne National Park. Owned by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Jordan's Ballast Showing Site. Remains of this wooden vessel are buried in Biscayne National Park. Owned by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, level of historical significance of this wreck is undetermined.

Keel Showing Site. Remains of this wooden vessel are buried in Biscayne National Park. Owned by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, level of historical significance of this wreck is undetermined.

Legare Anchorage Shipwreck. This wooden British merchant vessel, named H.M.S. Fowey, wrecked in 1748. Her scattered remains are buried in Biscayne National Park. Owned by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Pillar Dollar Wreck. Scattered remains of this wooden vessel are buried in 20 feet of water in Biscayne National Park near Homestead. Owned by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Georgia

C.S.S. Chattahoochee. The scattered remains of this Confederate States Navy wooden gunboat, built and sunk in 1863, are buried in 15 feet of water in an area encompassed by the Confederate Naval Museum in Columbus; the excavated stern is deposited in the museum. This wreck is entitled to sovereign immunity. Owned jointly by the U.S. Government, General Services Administration (which owns the unexcavated remains), and the city of Columbus (which owns the excavated stern). Managed by the city of Columbus. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

C.S.S. Georgia. The scattered remains of this Confederate States Navy ironclad battery are buried in 28 feet of water in the Savannah River near Savannah. Built in 1862 and sunk in 1864, this wreck is entitled to sovereign immunity. Owned by the U.S. Government, General Services Administration. Managed by the U.S. Government, Army Corps of Engineers. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

C.S.S. Jackson. This Confederate States Navy ironclad gunboat (ex-Muscogee), built in 1863 and sunk in 1865, has been completely excavated; the excavated remains are deposited in the Confederate Naval Museum in Columbus. Owned by the city of Columbus. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Guam

Aratama Maru. The scattered remains of this steel hulled freighter lie in 50 feet of water in Talofofo Bay. Built in 1938, this vessel was being used by the Japanese Navy as a transport when it sank in 1944, giving it sovereign immunity. Owned by the Japanese Government. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

S.M.S. Cormoran. This intact steel hulled steamer (ex-S.S. Rajasan) lies in 120 feet of water in outer Apra Harbor near Piti, within the waters of the U.S. naval station. Built in 1909, this ship was being used as a German commerce raider when it was scuttled by its crew in 1917 to avoid capture, giving it sovereign immunity. Owned by the German Government. Listed in the National Register as regionally significant.

Tokai Maru. This intact steel hulled passenger and cargo ship lies in 120 feet of water in outer Apra Harbor near Piti, within the waters of the U.S. naval station. Built in 1930, this ship was being used by the Japanese Navy when it sank in 1943, giving it sovereign immunity. Owned by the Japanese Government. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Hawaii

U.S.S. Arizona. This U.S. battleship, which is entitled to sovereign immunity, was sunk on December 7, 1941, in Pearl Harbor. The intact vessel lies in the U.S.S. Arizona Memorial in 38 feet of water. Owned by the U.S. Government, Department of the Navy. Managed by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as a National Historic Landmark.

U.S.S. Utah. This U.S. battleship, which is entitled to sovereign immunity, was sunk on December 7, 1941, in Pearl Harbor. The intact vessel is in 25 to 50 feet of water near Honolulu. Owned by the U.S. Government, Department of the Navy. Listed in the National Register as a National Historic Landmark.

Indiana

Muskegon. The remains of this wooden hulled side-wheel steamer (ex-Peerless) lie in 30 feet of water in Lake Michigan near Michigan City. She was built in 1872 and wrecked in 1911. Owned by the State of Indiana. Listed in the National Register as regionally significant.

Maine

Cora F. Cressy. The intact hulk of this wooden hulled schooner lies on the shoreline of Keene Narrows near Bremen. Built in 1902, she was sunk as a breakwater. Privately owned. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Defence. The remains of this wooden hulled Revolutionary War period brigantine lie buried in 23 feet of water in Stockton Springs Harbor. Built in 1778 and sunk in 1779 while privateering, this wreck is entitled to sovereign immunity. Owned by the U.S. Government, Department of the Navy. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Hesper. At high tide, the intact hulk of this wooden hulled schooner lies in 8 feet of water off the waterfront of Water Street in Wiscasset. She was built in 1918 and laid up in 1936. Privately owned. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Luther Little. The intact hulk of this wooden hulled freight schooner lies in 8 feet of water off the waterfront of Water Street in Wiscasset. She was built in 1917 and laid up in 1936. Privately owned. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Michigan

Algoma. The scattered remains of this steel hulled freighter lie in 50 feet of water near Isle Royale in Lake Superior, within Isle Royale National Park. She was built in 1883 and wrecked in 1885. Owned by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

America. This intact steel hulled freighter lies in 50 feet of water near Isle Royale in Lake Superior, within Isle Royale National Park. She was built in 1898 and wrecked in 1928. Owned by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Chester A. Congdon. This intact steel hulled freighter lies in 50 feet of water near Isle Royale in Lake Superior, within Isle Royale National Park. The vessel (ex-Salt Lake City) was built in 1907 and wrecked in 1918. Owned by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Cumberland. The scattered remains of this wooden hulled side-wheel freighter lie in 20 to 150 feet of water near Isle Royale in Lake Superior, within Isle Royale National Park. She was built in 1871 and wrecked in 1877. Owned by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Emperor. This intact, steel hulled freighter lies in 50 to 170 feet of water near Isle Royale in Lake Superior, within Isle Royale National Park. She was built in 1910 and wrecked in 1947. Owned by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

George M. Cox. The scattered remains of this steel hulled freighter (ex-Puritan) lie in 90 feet of water near Isle Royale in Lake Superior, within Isle Royale National Park. She was built in 1901 and wrecked in 1933. Owned by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Glenlyon. The scattered remains of this steel hulled freighter (ex-William H. Gratwick) lie in 60 feet of water near Isle Royale in Lake Superior, within Isle Royale National Park. She was built in 1893 and wrecked in 1924. Owned by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Henry Chisholm. The scattered remains of this wooden hulled freighter lie in 50 feet of water near Isle Royale in Lake Superior, within Isle Royale National Park. Built in 1880 and wrecked in 1898. Owned by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Indiana. This intact, wooden hulled freighter lies in 125 feet of water near Paradise in Lake Superior, within Whitefish Point Underwater Preserve. She was built in 1848 and wrecked in 1858. Owned by the State of Michigan, Department of Natural Resources. Determined eligible for the National Register as nationally significant.

Kamloops. This intact, steel hulled freighter lies in 180 to 260 feet of water near Isle Royale in Lake Superior, within Isle Royale National Park. She was built in 1924 and wrecked in 1927. Owned by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Monarch. The scattered remains of this wooden hulled freighter lie in 20 to 70 feet of water near Isle Royale in Lake Superior, within Isle Royale National Park. She was built in 1890 and wrecked in 1906. Owned by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Mississippi

Star of the West. This wooden hulled side-wheel steamer, built in 1852, was used by the Confederate States Navy. Renamed the C.S.S. Philip, the vessel was sunk in the Tallahatchie River near Greenwood in 1862 to create an obstacle to navigation against the Union. This shipwreck, which is entitled to sovereign immunity, is owned by the U.S. Government, General Services Administration. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Nebraska

Bertrand. The remains of this wooden stern-wheel steamboat lie in 15 feet of water at De Soto Bend in the Missouri River, near Blair, in the De Soto Wildlife Refuge. She was built in 1864 and sunk in 1865. Owned by the U.S. Government, Fish and Wildlife Service. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

New Jersey

Alexander Hamilton. The hulk of this steel hulled side-wheel steamer lies in 10 feet of water in New York Harbor near Earle. Built in 1924, she was laid up in 1977 in the Hudson River. Owned by the State of New Jersey. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Archeological Site #1. The remains of this wooden hulled vessel are buried in 5 feet of water in Barges Creek near Hamilton Township. Owned by the State of New Jersey. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Bead Wreck. The scattered remains of this wooden vessel are buried in 12 feet of water in the Mullica River near Chestnut Neck. Owned by the State of New Jersey. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

New York

Bessie M. Dustin. The remains of this wooden schooner are on the shore of Shooter's Island in New York Harbor. Built in 1918, this vessel was laid up in 1936. Owned by the State of New York. Determined eligible for the National Register as nationally significant.

H.M.S. Culloden. The intact remains of this wooden British man-of-war lie on the bottomlands of Fort Pond Bay. Built in 1776 and sunk in 1781, this vessel is entitled to sovereign immunity. Owned by the British Government. Listed in the National Register, level of historical significance is undetermined.

Hoffmans. The hulk of this wooden covered barge, built in 1907, lies on the shore of Shooter's Island in New York Harbor. Owned by the State of New York. Determined eligible for the National Register as nationally significant.

Jacob A. Decker. The hulk of this wooden barge, built in 1930, lies on the shore of Shooter's Island in New York Harbor. Owned by the State of New York. Determined eligible for the National Register as nationally significant.

Keating. The hulk of this wooden barge, built in 1912, lies on the shore of Shooter's Island in New York Harbor. Owned by the State of New York. Determined eligible for the National Register as nationally significant.

Minerva. The hulk of this wooden, side-wheel steamer (ex-Jane Moseley) lies in 10 feet of water near the shore of Shooter's Island in New York Harbor. Built in 1873, this vessel was laid up and dismantled in 1932. Owned by the State of New York. Determined eligible for the National Register as nationally significant.

Vessel 28. The hulk of this wooden tugboat lies on the shore of Shooter's Island in New York Harbor. Owned by the State of New York. Determined eligible for the National Register as nationally significant.

Vessel 30. The hulk of this wooden tugboat lies on the shore of Shooter's Island in New York Harbor. Owned by the State of New York. Determined eligible for the National Register as nationally significant.

Vessel 34. The hulk of this wooden tugboat lies on the shore of Shooter's Island in New York Harbor. Owned by the State of New York. Determined eligible for the National Register as nationally significant.

Vessel 37. The hulk of this wooden, covered barge lies on the shore of Shooter's Island in New York Harbor. Owned by the State of New York. Determined eligible for the National Register as nationally significant.

Vessel 41. The hulk of this wooden, covered barge lies on the shore of Shooter's Island in New York Harbor. Owned by the State of New York. Determined eligible for the National Register as nationally significant.

Vessel 43. The hulk of this wooden, covered barge lies on the shore of Shooter's Island in New York Harbor. Owned by the State of New York. Determined eligible for the National Register as nationally significant.

Vessel 48. The hulk of this wooden tugboat lies on the shore of Shooter's Island in New York Harbor. Owned by the State of New York. Determined eligible for the National Register as nationally significant.

Vessel 53. The hulk of this wooden, side-wheel steamer lies on the shore of Shooter's Island in New York Harbor. Owned by the State of New York. Determined eligible for the National Register as nationally significant.

Vessel 54. The hulk of this wooden package freighter lies in 10 feet of water near the shore of Shooter's Island in New York Harbor. Owned by the State of New York. Determined eligible for the National Register as nationally significant.

Vessel 59. The hulk of this wooden schooner lies on the shore of Shooter's Island in New York Harbor. Owned by the State of New York. Determined eligible for the National Register as nationally significant.

Vessel 84. The hulk of this wooden sailing lighter lies on the shore of Shooter's Island in New York Harbor. Owned by the State of New York. Determined eligible for the National Register as nationally significant.

North Carolina

A.P. Hurt. The intact remains of this iron hulled stern-wheel riverboat lie in 15 feet of water in the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. She was built in 1860 and wrecked in 1924. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Arabian. The intact remains of this wooden hulled side-wheel steamer are buried in 20 feet of water off Fort Fisher at Kure Beach. Built in 1851, she wrecked in 1863 while being used as a blockade runner. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Argonauta. Built in 1876, this iron hulled tugboat is laid up on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Argonauta Barge. The remains of this wooden barge are buried on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Barge #1. The remains of this wooden barge are on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Barge #2. The intact remains of this wooden barge are on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Barge #3. The intact remains of this wooden hopper barge are on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington, having been sunk to serve as a bulkhead. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Barge #4. The scattered remains of this wooden barge are on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Bendigo. The remains of this iron hulled side-wheel blockade runner (ex-Millie) are buried on the shore of Lockwood's Folly Inlet near Wilmington. She was built in 1863 and wrecked in 1864. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Bulkhead Barge. The remains of this wooden hulled barge lie submerged near the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Bulkhead Tugboat. The remains of this wooden hulled vessel are on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington, serving as a bulkhead. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Carolina Beach Inlet Recent. The remains of this iron hulled side-wheel blockade runner are buried in 10 feet of water in the Atlantic Ocean near Carolina Beach. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Carolina Beach Inlet South Site. The remains of this iron hulled side-wheel blockade runner are buried in 15 feet of water in the Atlantic Ocean near Carolina Beach. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Cherokee. The remains of the wooden hulled launch are buried on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Condor. The remains of this iron hulled side-wheel blockade runner are buried in 15 feet of water off Fort Fisher at Kure Beach. She was built and sunk in 1864. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

C.S.S. Raleigh. The scattered remains of this Confederate States Navy ironclad gunboat are buried in 20 feet of water off Fort Fisher at Kure Beach. She was built and sunk in 1864. This vessel is entitled to sovereign immunity. Owned by the U.S. Government, General Services Administration. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Dolphin. The intact remains of this wooden hulled tugboat, built in 1896, are on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Duoro. The remains of this iron hulled blockade runner, sunk in 1863, are buried in 10 feet of water in the Atlantic Ocean near Carolina Beach. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Eagles Island Launch. The remains of this wooden hulled launch are buried on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Eagles Island Other Skiff. The intact remains of this wooden hulled skiff are buried on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Eagles Island Side-wheel Steamer. The remains of this wooden hulled side-wheel steamer, named Sylvan Grove, are buried on the shore of Eagles Island in the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. She was built in 1858 and wrecked in 1891. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Eagles Island Skiff #1. The remains of this wooden hulled skiff are on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Elizabeth. The scattered remains of this wooden hulled side-wheel steamer (ex-Atlantic) are buried on the shore of Lockwood's Folly Inlet near Wilmington. Built in 1852, she sank in 1863 while blockade running. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Ella. The remains of this iron hulled side-wheel blockade runner, built and sunk in 1864, are buried in 15 feet of water at the mouth of the Cape Fear River near Bald Head Island. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

General Beauregard. The remains of this iron hulled side-wheel blockade runner (ex-Havelock) are buried in 15 feet of water in the Atlantic Ocean near Carolina Beach. Built in 1858 and sunk in 1863. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Government Barge. The remains of this wooden barge are buried on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

H.G. Wright. The remains of this wooden hulled stern-wheel snag boat, built in 1882, are buried on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Hebe. The remains of this iron hulled blockade runner, built and sunk in 1863, are buried in 22 feet of water in the Atlantic Ocean near Carolina Beach. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Iron Rudder Wreck. The remains of this wooden vessel are buried on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

John Knox. The remains of this wooden riverboat, built in 1919, lie in 10 feet of water in the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Last One Wreck. The remains of this wooden vessel lie in 2 feet of water near the shoreline of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Minnesota. The hulk of this wooden tugboat, built in 1910, is on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Modern Greece. The remains of this iron hulled blockade runner are buried in 15 feet of water off Fort Fisher at Kure Beach. Built in 1859 and sunk in 1862. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Moorefield Site. The remains of this iron hulled vessel are buried in 20 feet of water off Fort Fisher at Kure Beach. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Orange Street Wreck. The remains of this steel hulled yacht are buried in 15 feet of water in the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Phantom. The remains of this steel hulled blockade runner, built and sunk in 1863, are buried in 15 feet of water in Topsail Inlet near Topsail Island. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Ranger Site. The remains of this iron hulled side-wheel blockade runner, named Ranger, are buried in Lockwood's Folly Inlet near Wilmington. Built in 1863 and sunk in 1864. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Rich Inlet Wreck. The remains of this iron hulled side-wheel blockade runner, named Wild Dayrell, are buried in 10 feet of water in Rich Inlet near Figure 8 Island. Built in 1863 and sunk in 1864. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Sanded Barge. The remains of this wooden vessel are buried on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Skinner's Dock Wreck. The remains of this wooden vessel are buried in 25 feet of water in the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Splayed Wreck. The scattered remains of this wooden vessel are buried on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Steam Crane Barge #1. The intact remains of this wooden crane barge lie on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Stone #3. The hulk of this wooden tugboat (ex-Isabella), built in 1905, is on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Stone #4. The remains of this wooden tugboat, built in 1915, are buried on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Stone #5. The intact remains of this wooden tugboat (ex-Sadie E. Culver), built in 1896, are on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Stone #6. The intact remains of this wooden tugboat (ex-Atlantic City), built in 1890, are on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Stormy Petrel. The remains of this iron hulled side-wheel blockade runner, built and sunk in 1864, are buried in 20 feet of water off Fort Fisher at Kure Beach. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

The Little Barge. The remains of this wooden barge are buried on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

U.S.S. Aster. The remains of this wooden tugboat, sunk in 1864 while in use by the Union Navy as a gunboat, are buried in 20 feet of water off Fort Fisher at Kure Beach. This vessel is entitled to sovereign immunity. Owned by the U.S. Government, Department of the Navy. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

U.S.S. Iron Age. The remains of this wooden side-wheel gunboat are buried in 12 feet of water in Lockwood's Folly Inlet near Wilmington. Built in 1862, she sank in 1864 while in use as a Union Navy gunboat. This vessel is entitled to sovereign immunity. Owned by the U.S. Government, Department of the Navy. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

U.S.S. Louisiana. The remains of this iron hulled steamer are buried in 20 feet of water off Fort Fisher at Kure Beach. Built in 1860, she sank in 1864 while in use as a Union Navy powder vessel. This vessel is entitled to sovereign immunity. Owned by the U.S. Government, Department of the Navy. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

U.S.S. Monitor. The intact remains of this ironclad turret monitor lie in 230 feet of water on the outer continental shelf, in the U.S.S. Monitor National Marine Sanctuary. She was built in 1861 and sunk in 1862. Owned by the U.S. Government, General Services Administration. Managed by the U.S. Government, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Listed in the National Register as a National Historic Landmark.

U.S.S. Peterhoff. The remains of this iron hulled side-wheel steamer are buried in 30 feet of water off Fort Fisher at Kure Beach. She sank in 1864 while in use as a Union Navy gunboat, giving her sovereign immunity. Owned by the U.S. Government, Department of the Navy. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Wright Barge. The intact remains of this wooden barge are on the shore of the Cape Fear River near Wilmington. Owned by the State of North Carolina. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district, this wreck is nationally significant.

Oregon

Isabella. The remains of this wooden brig are buried in 40 feet of water off Cape Disappointment at the mouth of the Columbia River, near Astoria. Built in 1825, this vessel wrecked in 1830 while in use as a Hudson Bay Company supply ship. Owned by the State of Oregon, Division of State Lands. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Rhode Island

H.M.S. Orpheus. The remains of this wooden British frigate are buried in Narragansett Bay near Middletown. Built in 1773 for the Royal Navy, this vessel was scuttled in 1778. This vessel is entitled to sovereign immunity. Owned by the British Government. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district of national significance.

South Carolina

Brown's Ferry Wreck. The remains of this wooden sailing vessel are buried on the shore of the Black River near Georgetown. This vessel wrecked in 1740 while in use as a cargo vessel. Owned by the State of South Carolina, Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

Texas

Mansfield Cut Wrecks. The scattered remains of this wooden vessel, named San Esteban, are buried off Padre Island near Port Mansfield. This vessel, which wrecked in 1554 when part of a treasure flota, lies within the Padre Island National Seashore. Owned by the State of Texas, Texas Antiquities Committee. Managed by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district of national significance.

Mansfield Cut Wrecks. The scattered remains of this wooden vessel, named Santa Maria de Yciar, are buried off Padre Island near Mansfield. This vessel, which wrecked in 1554 when part of a treasure flota, lies within the Padre Island National Seashore. Owned by the State of Texas, Texas Antiquities Committee. Managed by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district of national significance.

Mansfield Cut Wrecks. The scattered remains of this wooden vessel, named Espiritu Santo, are buried off Padre Island near Port Mansfield. This vessel, which wrecked in 1554 when part of a treasure flota, lies within the Padre Island National Seashore. Owned by the State of Texas, Texas Antiquities Committee. Managed by the U.S. Government, National Park Service. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district of national significance.

U.S.S. Hatteras. The remains of this iron hulled, side-wheel schooner (ex-St. Mary's) are buried in 55 feet of water on the outer continental shelf off the coast of Galveston. Built in 1861, this vessel was in use by the Union Navy when it sank in 1863, giving her sovereign immunity. Owned by the U.S. Government, Department of the Navy. Listed in the National Register, level of historical significance is undetermined.

Virginia

Cornwallis Cave Wreck. The remains of this wooden Royal Navy transport and supply vessel are buried in 12 feet of water in the York River near Yorktwon. This vessel, which was scuttled in 1781, is entitled to sovereign immunity. Owned by the British Government. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district of regional significance.

C.S.S. Florida. The remains of this wooden Confederate States Navy cruiser are buried in 63 feet of water in the James River near Newport News. Built in 1863, this vessel was in the possession of the Union Navy as a prize of war when she sank in 1864. This vessel is entitled to sovereign immunity. Owned by the U.S. Government, Department of the Navy. Determined eligible for the National Register as nationally significant.

H.M.S. Charon. The remains of this wooden Royal Navy fifth-rate warship lie in 15 feet of water in the York River off Gloucester Point. Built in 1778 and sunk in 1781, this vessel is entitled to sovereign immunity. Owned by the British Government. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district of regional significance.

U.S.S. Cumberland. The scattered remains of this wooden Union Navy frigate are buried in 40 feet of water in the James River off Pier C at Newport News. Built in 1842 and sunk in 1862, this vessel is entitled to sovereign immunity. Owned by the U.S. Government, Department of the Navy. Determined eligible for the National Register as nationally significant.

Yorktown Fleet #1. The remains of this wooden Royal Navy transport are buried in 15 feet of water in the York River off Gloucester Point. Scuttled in 1781, this vessel is entitled to sovereign immunity. Owned by the British Government. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district of national significance.

Yorktown Fleet #2. The remains of this wooden Royal Navy transport are buried in 60 feet of water in the York River near Yorktown. Scuttled in 1781, this vessel is entitled to sovereign immunity. Owned by the British Government. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district of national significance.

Yorktown Fleet #3. The remains of this wooden Royal Navy transport are buried in 20 feet of water in the York River near Yorktown. Scuttled in 1781, this vessel is entitled to sovereign immunity. Owned by the British Government. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district of national significance.

Yorktown Fleet #4. The remains of this wooden Royal Navy transport are buried in 30 feet of water in the York River near Yorktown. Scuttled in 1781, this vessel is entitled to sovereign immunity. Owned by the British Government. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district of national significance.

Yorktown Fleet #5. The remains of this wooden Royal Navy transport are buried in 20 feet of water in the York River near Yorktown. Scuttled in 1781, this vessel is entitled to sovereign immunity. Owned by the British Government. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district of national significance.

Yorktown Fleet #6. The remains of this wooden Royal Navy transport are buried in 20 feet of water in the York River near Yorktown. Scuttled in 1781, this vessel is entitled to sovereign immunity. Owned by the British Government. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district of national significance.

Yorktown Wreck. The remains of this wooden merchant vessel, used as a Royal Navy transport and supply ship, lie in 20 feet of water in the York River near Yorktown. Scuttled in 1781, this vessel is entitled to sovereign immunity. Owned by the British Government. Listed in the National Register as part of an archeological district of national significance.

Virgin Islands

H.M.S. Santa Monica. The remains of this wooden Royal Navy frigate lie in 24 feet of water in Round Bay near Coral Bay. Wrecked in 1782 while on patrol, this vessel is entitled to sovereign immunity. Owned by the British Government. Listed in the National Register as locally significant.

Washington

La Merced. The hulk of this wooden schooner lies on the shore of the Guemes Channel in Puget Sound near Anacortes. Built in 1917, this vessel was laid up to form a breakwater. Privately owned. Listed in the National Register as nationally significant.

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