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"Journey from Slavery to Statesman": The Homes of Frederick Douglass--
Supplementary Resources


The life of Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), the outstanding African American of the nineteenth century, encompassed slavery, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and Jim Crow. He recorded his experiences in three autobiographies. The following resources provide more information on Frederick Douglass and the history of African Americans in the 19th ct. in the United States:

Frederick Douglass National Historic Site
Frederick Douglass National Historic Site is a unit of the National Park Service. The park's website contains numerous resources to learn about Frederick Douglass and his home, Cedar Hill, in Washington, DC. One of those resources is a virtual tour of his home.

New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park
New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park is a unit of the National Park Service. The park's website offers a variety of resources discussing the history of New Bedford and its whaling history. Included on the site is an online tour of the community that includes the home of Nathan and Polly Johnson.

TwHP Feature: African American History
This collection of Teaching with Historic Places lesson plans examine various aspects of African American history in the United States, such as "Free Frank" McWorter's New Philadelphia, Dr. Manassa T. Pope and Mary McLeod Bethune.

Aboard the Underground Railroad Travel Itinerary
The Discover Our Shared Heritage online travel itinerary on the Underground Railroad provides a history of the most well known escape system in the U.S. before the Civil War. Are any of the places listed in your state?

Washington, DC, Travel Itinerary
The Discover Our Shared Heritage online travel itinerary on Washington, DC, contains a write-up on Douglass's home, Cedar Hill.

Places Reflecting America's Diverse Cultures Travel Itinerary
The Discover Our Shared Heritage online travel itinerary on America's diverse cultural groups in the United States includes the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site (Cedar Hill) in Washington, DC.

Discovery News
Discovery.com has produced a video that discusses the archeological excavation of slave housing on Wye Plantation.

Nathan and Polly Johnson House
For more information on Nathan and Polly Johnson in New Bedford, Massachusetts, the New Bedford Historical Society offers information about their home and abolitionist beliefs.

Frederick Douglass Home on Alexander Street
This history of Douglass's home in Rochester, New York covers his role in the Underground Railroad and his experience living in a place where many people were initially hostile to him.

Biography.com: Frederick Douglass
This website provides a detailed biography on Frederick Douglass. It also has video a 45 minute video (approximately) about Douglass. Related video content is also available covering the Civil War, abolition, and women's rights.

Library of Congress
The Library of Congress holds a number of Frederick Douglass's papers. The site also offers suggestions for critical thinking and arts and humanities activities. The Library of Congress also has a collection of Frederick Douglass: Online Resources that offers a variety of links to content, activities, exhibits, photos, and other resources discussing Douglass.

Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers' Project, 1936-1938 contains more than 2,300 first-person accounts of slavery and 500 black-and-white photographs of former slaves. These narratives were collected in the 1930s as part of the Federal Writers' Project of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) and assembled and microfilmed in 1941 as the seventeen-volume Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States from Interviews with Former Slaves.

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
The library at UNC Chapel Hill offers digital copies of slave narratives in their "Documenting the Old South" online collection. Included in this collection are the three autobiographies of Frederick Douglass. A Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845), My Bondage and My Freedom (1855), and Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (1881).

The Historical Society of Talbot County
The historical society provides a detailed history of Frederick Douglass, "Talbot County's Native Son".

For Further Reading
For more about Frederick Douglass, check out his three autobiographies. These can be accessed online at the UNC Chapel Hill library: A Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845), My Bondage and My Freedom (1855), and Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (1881).

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