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National Register of Historic Places Program

The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the Nation's historic places worthy of preservation. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service's National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America's historic and archeological resources.

 

Property Name Garth Newel
Reference Number 13000402
State Virginia
County Bath
Town Hot Springs
Street Address 447 Garth Newel Lane
Multiple Property Submission Name N/A
Status Listed 6/19/2013
Areas of Significance ARCHITECTURE, ART
Link to full file http://www.nps.gov/history/nr/feature/places/pdfs/13000402.pdf
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Garth Newel was the Bath County, Virginia, residence of William Sergeant Kendall (1869-1938) and his second wife Christine Herter Kendall (1890-1981 ). Together they built the estate beginning in 1923, shortly after their permanent move to Virginia. For the remainder of their lives, Garth Newel was their focus, providing them a rural yet sophisticated estate at which they painted, raised award-winning Arabian horses, and participated in the elite society of Bath County. Lovers of music, the Kendalls were known for hosting small concerts in the main residence at Garth Newel. The property is eligible for the National Register at the statewide level of significance under Criterion B for its association with William Sergeant Kendall. A distinguished artist, William Sergeant Kendall achieved international recognition as a highly regarded painter in the academic style. During the latter part of Kendall's career, his Bath County estate provided him, all under one roof, with studio space, storage for his paintings as well as a large residence suitable for entertaining family and the society of Bath County. Garth Newel represents the sole residence and studio of Kendall from 1923 to 1938. Though at least three of his former residences and studio spaces survive, none was occupied by Kendall for such an extended period. Though Kendall was 54 years of age when he moved to Virginia, he continued to paint and exhibit until his death at the age of 69. Christine Herter Kendall, a noted but less accomplished artist, author, musician and patron of the arts, continued to make Garth Newel her home until her death in 1981. Though not as widely known or successful, Christine Herter Kendall pursued her love of painting and music, and through her generous patronage, encouraged others to appreciate and pursue the arts. In 1973, she co-founded the Garth Newel Music Center and upon her death, bequeathed her property to this nonprofit thus ensuring that Garth Newel would continue as a venue for small concerts. As the only residential music center in Virginia that exists strictly for the study and performance of chamber music, it has achieved significance in the past 50 years, thus Criterion Consideration G applies.

 

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Properties are listed in the National Register of Historic Places under four criteria: A, B, C, and D. For information on what these criterion are and how they are applied, please see our Bulletin on How to Apply the National Register Criteria